10 Things I Love About Being A Makeup Artist

10 Things I Love About Being A Makeup Artist

  • Creativity: Makeup is truly an art. Even when I need to create the more “subtle” and “natural” looks, they still require a level of creativity to make sure I am emphasizing each individual’s features appropriately. Then there are the more “out there” looks, like for Halloween. Those are a LOT of fun!
  • Business: I am fortunate to be able to run my own business making people up, waxing, tinting, and lifting lashes. To successfully run your own business though, you need to enjoy the business side enough to want to grow it and remain professional, even when it’s not easy.
  • Diversity: I love the fact that I never really know what kind of client I will have next. Will they be quiet or excited? Will they be darker or lighter? Will they want the most subtle look or a completely dramatic look? Diversity definitely spices things up and makes this career more interesting and exciting!
  • Eyelashes: Whether I am completing a makeup look with fake lashes or lifting and tinting your own lashes, I LOVE LASHES! So much so that I even have them tattooed on me! I love using individual cluster lashes to be able to fully customize the look per client. I love how many different styles of lashes come in. I love how much they complete a makeup look or open up your eyes, make you look more awake, and make you look camera ready.
  • New Makeup Releases: A great aspect of being a makeup artist is never getting too comfortable with the makeup you always use. The cosmetics market is so saturated, you would be a fool not to try some new goodies every now and then! You never know what could be the next best thing for your kit and your clients.
  • Wedding Day Bliss: I specialize in bridal makeup services and nothing makes me more elated than seeing a stunning, happy bride from the inside out! I adore seeing the whole look come together in front of their eyes and mine. Their confidence to walk down the aisle to their new life makes me so giddy!
  • Makeup Lessons: Another fun part of my business I offer are makeup lessons. I have taught young girls just starting out, makeup enthusiasts wanting to become professionals, and older women wanting to refresh their look. I enjoy being able to fully customize the experience for each client’s needs while providing constructive criticism and a hand on approach to make sure they’re getting the most out of their lesson.
  • Education: Makeup Artistry is definitely a world where you have to take voluntary continued education to continue to be successful with it. I say voluntarily because unlike other professions like teaching and nursing where you are required to take a certain number of hours per year to stay licensed, with makeup it’s usually not required. Every state varies in what is and isn’t legal when it comes to being a makeup artist. I live in CT where you don’t need ANY licensure or certification to be considered “professional”. This means I’m all about the education, certificates, and more to prove that I take this super seriously and want to provide only the best services to my clients.
  • Networking: Not only is networking with other industry professionals like photographers, DJs, venues, etc. important to help your business flourish, it’s also super fun! Once you find your niche in this saturated industry, you’ll start attracting the right kind of industry professionals that will help you flourish both professionally as well as personally. It’s a lot of fun to make friends with people who understand your dreams and sacrifices!
  • Photography: Although I would never call myself a photographer by any means, I love the aspect of photography that comes with being a makeup artist in the 21st century. Social media has become bigger than ever and it’s super important to put out content that is authentic, not overly edited, and high quality – in terms of the makeup AND photography. I invested in a good camera a couple years ago and it has paid off tremendously – not to mention it’s also fun to use!

Credit: Lauren Page – Owner of LA Page Makeup

Website: www.lapagemakeup.com

Instagram: www.instagram.com/lapagemakeupofficial

Facebook: www.facebook.com/lapagemakeup

Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/lapagemakeup

Twitter: www.twitter.com/lapagemakeup 

Banner Image: Talia White

 

9 SIGNS YOU SHOULD BE A MAKEUP ARTIST FOR A LIVING

There is more in MakeUp Artistry than just helping people finding their best look. Times have changed and today we can consider makeup as an ART. The word ‘artist’ comes from one who professes and practices an imaginative art. If makeup isn’t imaginative we are on the wrong path. MakeUp is magic. So let’s see if you’re ready to face a MakeUp Artist career.
1 – YOU LOVE MAKEUP
So, 1st sign. Are you a wizard? Well you could be if you considered your hundred brushes as magic wands. You love everything in a makeup kit. Blushes, highlighters, the endless eyeshadow rainbow, lipsticks. You name it, you love it. Beauty trends are more important to you than anything else. And if you are ahead of them… what are you waiting for?
2 – YOU ARE A PEOPLE PERSON
Interaction with people is constant. You can find yourself dealing with a nervous bride or a really strict client, even a spoiled famous person. Sometimes the reference they show you is inadmissible for you. Being able to deal with different types of personalities and handling difficult situations is essential in this career. If you like being around people and are easy going you might be hitting the right spot.
3 – CREATIVE FREAK
Do you love experimenting with different styles and products every time you have the chance? In the fashion industry, you’ll need to find and create new inventive looks that have never been seen before. With bridal or social events clients, we should always consider their style and combine it with ours. In any situation, you need to be creative enough in order to satisfy the viewing eye or the person wearing your piece of art.
4 – YOU ARE OPEN TO CRITICISM
You understand that criticism is not always negative. Feedback is really important for a makeup artist. From a client or colleague, maybe you find yourself learning something new. So being able to deal with bad comments about your work and feeling that this is a way of growing as a professional is super important!
5 – YOU ARE A FREE SPIRIT
You can’t even think of yourself in an office sitting at a desk all day. You like meeting new people, being in new places and working in different environments every time you can. Living with what you create with your hands and imagination makes you happy.
6 – YOU GET THRILLED WITH SATISFACTION
Sometimes you get excited simply by getting a great job done. This happens as a MakeUp artist when you finish a really good photoshoot, with the joy of a bride’s smile or a person that looks at herself in the mirror and loves you because she has never looked better. These are feelings of joy that a MUA gets as a rush of satisfaction, not only about the money you get paid, but because you are fulfilled as an artist. Meeting the clients’ expectations or an amazing photo for your portfolio has made your day.
7 – YOU KNOW YOUR GAME
It’s easy for you to notice MakeUp horrors. It’s impossible to miss an asymmetric wing eye or a wrong shade of foundation. Are you the type of person that always wants to put your fingers in other people’s faces to try to even or clean makeup? Then you’re definitely cut out for this profession!
8 – BOSSY BOSSY
Have you ever felt it was impossible for you to follow others’ commands? You are a leader. Not everyone is cut out to be an entrepreneur. You are disciplined, responsible, punctual and able to get the job done in a strict time frame. It’s true that you might start doing assisting jobs, which is good because you can learn from senior MakeUp artists. After you gained some experience and confidence, get ready to be the best head of the makeup department.
9 – YOU UNDERSTAND MAKEUP AS AN ART
 As a Makeup Artist you get that being one of this kind is not just making someone look better, it is an art. The face of the person you are about to work on becomes a canvas, and you begin to fly. If you like stroking your brushes and creating ideas, trying new techniques and get the best out of your creativity you are ready to become part of the future generation of MakeUp artists. Even if you are working in fashion, being a social media influencer… nowadays working with makeup is thinking about trends and being ahead.
So if you feel this is you, perhaps a profession test is obsolete at this point! Go out and check the best makeup schools to develop your new career! I am certain that you will enjoy it. Good luck!
Clara Luelmo
@claraluelmo (instagram)
I am a professional makeup artist and hairstyler with a fashion degree and almost a decade of experience. Working between London and Buenos Aires I have gained experience in fashion, filming, commercial, bridal and theatre. Trained in special fx and fashion makeup and hair. 100% reliable and used to work in a fast-paced environment,  also following time schedules. I have experience both leading a makeup team as well as assisting other makeup artists.
Banner Image
Jessica Stam Photographed by Michaelangelo di Battista

10 Fundamentals About being a makeup artist You Didn’t Learn in makeup School

Makeup artist is certainly one of the most vivid and creative professions. We draw inspiration from everything that surrounds us, we use the textures that surround us, we change the person completely, create a new character, or emphasize the natural beauty. Human being  is our canvas.

Everything you learn in makeup school is about techniques and, sometimes, if you’re lucky enough, about how to find inspiration. It is certainly not enough, there are so many aspects of this profession that you will have to learn by yourself. I will try to tell about them, based on my personal experience.

 

1) Thirst for knowledge. That’s basic! The work of a makeup artist is associated with constant training, improvement of your skills, testing various textures, mixes. You will have to learn the colors, light effects and  to master the human anatomy. When you are left alone with the client, you have a couple of seconds to understand what textures, what colors you should use, where the shadow will fall and where will be partial shade. So if you think your makeup school  will be enough then… don’t even try to be a makeup artist. Yes, you will have to invest your time and finances in your training.

 

2) Sociability. You have to constantly communicate. We are not just makeup artists for our clients, we are psychologists. How important it is to calm down the bride before one of the most important events of her life! Our customers are very sensitive to intonation, way of talking. Do not be familiar, be extremely polite, but friendly.

But our clients are not only brides and girls who have an important event, our clients are photographers, editors of various magazines. Be able to listen to the customer, their job and be able to explain how it is possible to perform. Communicate with photographers and videographers, because they are one of the foundations of being a makeup artist.

 

3) Respect for your work. Know how to say no when you need to. I had to learn it on my own. Set prices and keep them. Everyone wants it cheaper, but no one understands how much you invest in your tools, cosmetics and knowledge. The make-up artist’s work is truely work and worth its price.

Unfortunately, in our age of digital technology, our profession is almost devalued. Why? Because there are a lot of tutorials on youtube where you will be taught makeup tips for free. Most of the professional cosmetics become available to anybody!

That’s why many makeup artists feel the urge to get trained in an additional profession, manicurist, hair dresser, cosmetologist, etc.

Sometimes a client do not want to pay, well, it is also an experience. If possible, of course you should get paid  for your job, if not, then wash off the client’s face !

 

4) Competitiveness.

While studying at school, you are already studying with your competitors. Now there are a lot of makeup artists, so you need to offer something that others cannot do. You need to be different from the others, so you have to invest time and money in your training, in your cosmetics, in your advertising (website, social networks, flyers…). Think of your name as a brand, even local brand.

 

5) Individuality. Feed yourself.

Our little secrets, our super tricks. This is what can set you apart from other makeup artists, from your appearance to the technique you use.  Find the small thing in which you can be the best, in which you can express your talent at its best.

 

6) Stress and lack of affect.

This is important. Do not let emotions overwhelm you, be able to control yourself. No matter how capricious the client is, smile and keep working. No matter how extravagant the customer is, behave in a relaxed, friendly and open way. It may be a good opportunity to learn something!

If you show yourself irritated, then believe me, it will be an extra reason for your client to find something negative in your work.

 

7) Self-defense and security basics.

No one is safe from an aggressive client. It could be a Perv photographer or a hysterical client. Be ready for anything and fight back if anything happens. Sometimes your job can end late at night, but you will still need to come back home, so take any security measures. If you have any doubt about the client, tell all the details to your family or friends and ask them to call back within half an hour when you expect to arrive at the client.

 

8) Self-feedback. You must invest yourself in your work. You should follow the important events of the year, such as Oscar, Met Gala, etc. Watch all the fashion shows, cruise collections, bloggers, top makeup artists, because they dictate the fashion trends.

Read articles, go to the Museum, be inspired by art. Draw, create, think about makeup! Give most of yourself to your profession.

 

9) Good photographer. I hope no one thinks that right after school all the famous photographers and magazines are waiting for you with open arms. Of course no. In order to have a beautiful portfolio, you have to find good photographers and talented models. To do this, you will have to choose your target audience. If you plan to work as a wedding makeup artist look for a wedding photographer, models, dresses, participate in various wedding projects, etc. Believe me it is unlikely that a professional photographer (and model) will agree to work with a novice makeup artist showing a portfolio made of training pictures. Exercise your eyes to distinguish good photographers from bad ones and start networking. Ask them if you can help for collaborations and reassure the photographer regarding the quality of your work (and be sure you can do it !), you can even come to them with creative ideas.

Or be ready to invest money, for a good portfolio. Or be ready to marry a talented photographer like I did!

 

10) The most important from the most important, it won’t be taught anywhere. That’s basic! Love your profession, breathe it, live it. Being a makeup artist is great!

 

Charlotte Khasanshina

Website: http://www. charlottekh.com
Instagram : @charlottekh_mua
Facebook : @charlottefrmua
E-mail: hello@charlottekh.com

 

Banner Image Credit

Kasia Struss Photographed by Victor Demarchelier

How to Create a Fashion or Beauty Shoot

How to Create a Fashion or Beauty Shoot

Photoshoots are so much more than simply picking up a camera and snapping a few pictures. As a photographer, I constantly find myself in awe of the artistic process involved in transforming an idea into a visual medium. Given the endless possibilities for innovative content, it’s crucial to have a unique and creative concept that can be translated into a photograph. I find that the two types of photoshoots that best accomplish this are tied to fashion and beauty. Whether you’re going for simple or showy, fashion and beauty photoshoots have a distinct way of showcasing a vast array of talent. With that being said, I’m going to share eight-step process in developing the perfect beauty and/ or fashion shoot.

 

STEP ONE: THE VISION

Going into a photo shoot with no vision is like hopping off an airplane with no parachute; it’s simply a terrible idea. An excellent way to get started is to ask yourself some questions to get those brain juices brewing. What inspires you? What’s your style? What does your perfect shot look like? Once you figure this out, now it all must come together. Be as extra as you want. If a look seems impossible to pull off, that’s all the more reason to try it out. After all, this is your shoot. Why not do whatever you want? However, if you’re still having trouble developing your vision, no need to fret. Step two will help you out.

 

STEP TWO: RESEARCH IDEAS

If you have yet to hear about Pinterest, finish this article, go straight to the app store, and download it immediately. However, if you want to skip the app store or the internet altogether, inspiration is everywhere you look. If you’re a fan of the great outdoors, let the hues of nature be your guide. The beauty of flowers and sunsets never goes out of style. If you’re more of a homebody (like myself), just look around your room. Perhaps you’ll notice certain colors or details in your comforter that weren’t there five minutes ago.

 

STEP THREE: RALLY THE TROOPS

A photographer is only as good as his/ her team members, so once you feel your vision is ready for execution, fire up the group chat to ensure everyone is on the same page. I can’t emphasize this enough, but articulate exactly what you’re going for. Do yourself a favor and eliminate the number of problems that may arise later on.

 

STEP FOUR: PLAN, PLAN, PLAN!

Now that you have steps one through three on lock, it’s time to set the date. This goes without saying, but make sure you, your team, and your model are all available on the same day at the same time. For instance, if your model only has a one-hour time slot to dedicate to your shoot, postponing is always a viable option. Even the most minimalistic shoot can eat a huge chunk of your day, so be sure to plan out every detail, and include some extra time for incidentals. This includes but is not limited to fashion faux pas, makeup mishaps, etc. Just remember to take a deep breath and not stress too much when things don’t go according to plan.

 

STEP FIVE: GET THE GOODS

While having an awesome photoshoot idea is, well, awesome, you must have the necessary tools to execute these ideas swirling around in your head. It’s like expecting a painter to paint without any paint (try saying that five times fast). Some basic things you’ll need to create the environment for a photo shoot are proper lighting, a DSLR camera, a makeup artist, a model, a backdrop, and software for editing(my recommendations are Photoshop and Lightroom). If you’re doing a fashion shoot, you must add in clothing, props, and any necessary permits if you plan on shooting at a specific location. This may sound overwhelming and potentially expensive if you don’t currently have these items, but the internet can be a magical place. There are countless apps and websites you can pillage through to purchase on the cheap, borrow, or even rent anything and everything you need. Now, if you have all these tools, what do you do with them?

 

STEP SIX: LIGHTS, CAMERA, ACTION

Congratulations! The big day has finally arrived! This means that it’s time to haul out your equipment, play some music, and get to work. Before you get all gung-ho on your shutter button though, be sure to check your lighting and camera settings. Keep in mind that soft, natural light can work, but having studio lighting is ideal. A Speedlite unit, beauty dish, and reflector are great tools to give proper lighting and reduce appearances of flaws in the skin. This also entails constantly checking to see if the image is under or over-exposed. Don’t think you can fix everything in post! Additionally, understanding your camera settings on manual mode is the best way to shoot because you are in control of how the picture turns out. Settings will vary, however, based on the mood, lighting, and theme of your shoot. For example, in my most recent publication, the settings were at ISO 125, f-stop was 5.0, and shutter speed was 160.

 

STEP SEVEN: CONCENTRATION ON COMMUNICATION

I’m sure we’ve all heard the phrase “communication is key.” Well, this is quintessential when it comes to photo shoots. Without effective communication, your entire shoot could be ruined. You may feel like a nag with having to open your yapper every second, but this infinitely beats the alternative, i.e., all your pictures coming out undesirable and unusable. Let your model know what poses your thinking of, and don’t be afraid to correct him or her if the pose isn’t exactly what you want. The same goes for your team; if they’re doing an awesome job, let them know. If they aren’t doing such a swell job, suck it up and let them know.

 

STEP EIGHT: HAVE FUN!

Last but certainly not least is my golden rule. Don’t forget that with fashion and beauty photography, there is no right or wrong way to be creative. The technique is still a crucial part of creating an image, but don’t let the stress of attempting to create a perfect image take away from the enjoyment of photography.

 

Authors: Alexa Tokich and Jenna Morgan

Editor: Jenna Morgan

Instagram handles: @tokich_photography and @jenna__layne

 

Golden Eye

Beauty Editorial Submission Golden Eye – captured by fashion photographer Petro Tiahur for Flawless Magazine.

Beauty Editorial Submission

Beauty Editorial Submission Golden Eye – captured by fashion photographer Petro Tiahur for Flawless Magazine. Hair styling and make-up by Michelle Parezanovic.

Credits to Mac Cosmetics, Melt Cosmetics, Anastasia Beverly Hills, Morphe Cosmetics, Sigma Beauty, Makeup Geek Cosmetics, LimeCrime Cosmetics, Mehron, CoverGirl and iWataMeda Airbrush Machine.

Editorial Story:”I don’t really have a story for this trio of images. I get inspired by many different styles of art, pop art, abstract, vortex and drip art. Fashion is a big inspiration to me as well. Anything grunge, punk, alternative or goth I love. I felt like I needed to express all sides of my creativity. Day, evening and avant garde. This collection was originally for Canadian Makeup of the year but I did not make it to the semi final round. I feel like these photos need to be seem my people other then my friends and family. I put my blood sweat and tears into my work and I refuse to go unnoticed.”
Tell the world about your creative journey. :
“I have been a M.A.C MUA for 4 years, a freelance artist for almost 9 years and a hairstylist for 3 years. The beauty industry has always been something that I am very passionate about and take very seriously. I started doing makeup when I was 10 years old. I’d watch my mom in the bathroom put her face on and couldn’t wait till I was old enough to be able to do mine. I took that fascination and turned it into a career. I could never imagine doing anything else with my life. I am always looking for a new creative way to express myself as an artist. I recently was accepted into the Val Garland School of Makeup but had to drop out due to personal reasons. It was the hardest decision I have ever had to make.Someone once told me “passion is most important. Be an artist first and a hairstylist/MUA second. Don’t compromise yourself or sell out. Climb the ladder and don’t lose hope when it’s taking forever. Cry when you need to: people with passion can’t help it. Remember to always be humble and learn from those who came before you. You will NEVER know it all so always keep learning even from those who you think can’t teach you anything. Most of all remember it’s not going to be easy. Ever. So know that you didn’t do this for the money or the recognition. Know that artists don’t live their art everyday because they want to or because they love it. They live it because they don’t have a choice. They live it because they ache without it. Dont expect anything back. Don’t expect recognition for your efforts. Don’t expect your genius to be discovered or your love to be understood. Create because you need to create.” This person is the reason why I do what I do.”
Photographer-Katrina-Forster-web-desire

Web of Desire

Beauty Editorial Web of Desire– captured by fashion photographer Katrina Forster for Flawless Magazine.

Beauty Editorial Beauty Editorial Beauty Editorial

Beauty Editorial Web of Desire– captured by fashion photographer Katrina Forster for Flawless Magazine. Jewellery Designer – Celestial Fine Jewels , Hair styling and make-up by  Makeup artistMelinda Wenig and Models -Rachel Macintosh ,Kate Van De Jagt Brooke Moorehead ,Sienna Wiltshire,Reece Conley

Editorial :”The Title is ‘Web of Desire’ which came to mind when you see these unique Jewellery pieces… there is a definite desire to want to own one, then once spotting the spider earrings that are covered in diamonds, what better name!
The designer jewels in the image are from an up and coming Gemologist who has hand-picked the diamonds and gems from around the world and design each piece as a one of a kind piece. The jewels vary in price from $2,500 – $32,000AUD”
Tell the world about your creative journey. :”I fell into Makeup Artistry through mistake… but I found it to be the most challenging, interesting career path that suits me to a tea! I love change and keeping life exciting, so always working different places, meeting different people and getting to travel around the world in the process… what more can I ask for. I’m fortunate enough to be heading the Makeup Team for the World Supermodel Pageant next year, which will be taking me to Fiji and South Africa at the beginning of the year.”
Beauty Editorial Bedroom

Bedroom Eyes

Beauty Editorial Bedroom Eyes– captured by Weybridge fashion photographer Konstantin Sedlacek for Flawless Magazine.

Beauty Editorial Bedroom Beauty Editorial Bedroom

Beauty Editorial Bedroom Eyes– captured by Weybridge fashion photographer Konstantin Sedlacek for Flawless Magazine. Styling courtesy of fashion stylist Jourdan Walker. Hair styling by Jourdan Walker and make-up by  Makeup artist Jourdan Walker and Model: Jourdan Walker.

At Flawless we dedicate every scrap of our energy towards supporting the future stars of the fashion, art and design worlds. Competition out there is tough, and we strive to ensure that beautiful creations can survive and flourish. We give that first leg up, that first spark of confidence, to a budding Ricardo Tisci, Alexander McQueen or Ines & Vinoodh. We are passionate hunters of that one raw pearl nestled in a hundred million grains of sand.

Fashion Editorial Submission

Evolution

Fashion Editorial Submission Evolution – captured by Markham fashion photographer Will Wayne  and Ann Lin  for Flawless Magazine.

Fashion Editorial Submission Fashion Editorial Submission Fashion Editorial Submission Fashion Editorial Submission

Fashion Editorial Submission Evolution – captured by Markham fashion photographer Will Wayne  and Ann Lin  for Flawless Magazine. Creative Director: Erika Fung. Styling courtesy of fashion stylist Erika Fung. Hair styling by Erika fung, Ronald Lam, Arisa Yamasaki, Yumika Itou and make-up by  Makeup artist Christina Nguyen and Models: Diane (Plutino Group), Lu (Push Management), Sabrina Wong

 

At Flawless we dedicate every scrap of our energy towards supporting the future stars of the fashion, art and design worlds. Competition out there is tough, and we strive to ensure that beautiful creations can survive and flourish. We give that first leg up, that first spark of confidence, to a budding Ricardo Tisci, Alexander McQueen or Ines & Vinoodh. We are passionate hunters of that one raw pearl nestled in a hundred million grains of sand.

Beauty Editorial Submission

Space Odyssey

Beauty Editorial Submission Space Odyssey – captured by fashion photographer Artur Madej for Flawless Magazine.

Beauty Editorial Submission Beauty Editorial Submission

Beauty Editorial Submission Space Odyssey – captured by fashion photographer Artur Madej for Flawless Magazine. Hair styling by Dariusz Błaszczyk  and make-up by  Makeup artist Katarzyna Biały. Model Natalia Grabowska (NEVA Models)

Beauty Editorial Submission

Cube

Beauty Editorial Submission Cube – captured by fashion photographer and stylist Anna Krivenkoff for Flawless Magazine.

Beauty Editorial Submission Beauty Editorial Submission Beauty Editorial Submission Beauty Editorial Submission

Beauty Editorial Submission Cube – captured by fashion photographer and stylist Anna Krivenkoff for Flawless Magazine. Hair and make-up by Anastasiya Pavlova. Model Marina Afrikantova

 

Editorial  Story: “Working on this beauty story I was inspired by the futuristic style, trying to capture a beautiful creature, looking as if she’s alien fashionista, traveling on her space shuttle, glowing and glittering with different colors and lights in the darkness, with her unusual make-up and hair style and different accessories…”

About the photographer:” :
I am a young international award winning photographer based in Los Angeles and Moscow. I love to capture mesmerizing shots in styles involved with fashion and beauty, family portraits and editorial work, working with all kinds of models and admiring the different beauty each individual carries. I take time with each image, capturing my love and devotion to my work with every piece I produce.  “